by Daniel Thiry

The idea of virtual Kubernetes clusters (vClusters) is to spin up a fully-functional cluster within another Kubernetes cluster to provide an efficient abstraction and direct Kubernetes access on top of a shared underlying cluster.

I have already described the benefits and use cases use of such virtual clusters for development, and specifically for cloud-native development, CI/CD, and ML/AI experimentation. However, since vClusters are similarly flexible as regular Kubernetes clusters and namespaces, they can also be used in many situations apart from development.

In this article, I want to describe some of these production use cases that I…


by Daniel Thiry

Virtual Kubernetes Clusters (vClusters) have the potential to bring Kubernetes adoption to the next level. They are running in a physical Kubernetes cluster and can be used in the same way as normal clusters, but still are just a virtual construct. (Learn more about how virtual Clusters work here). Similar to Virtual Machines that revolutionized the use of physical servers, virtual Kubernetes clusters have some benefits compared to physical clusters, which make them particularly useful for some scenarios.

In this article, I will describe the benefits of virtual Kubernetes clusters and provide some use cases in which…


by Fabian Kramm

Picture of an iPhone with the calculator app open
Picture of an iPhone with the calculator app open

Virtual Kubernetes clusters are fully functional Kubernetes clusters that run within another Kubernetes cluster. The difference between a regular Kubernetes namespace and a virtual cluster is that a virtual cluster has its own separate Kubernetes control plane and storage backend. Only a handful of core resources, such as pods and services, are actually shared among the virtual and host cluster. All other resources, such as CRDs, statefulsets, deployments, webhooks, jobs, etc., only exist in the pure virtual Kubernetes cluster.

This provides a lot better isolation than a regular Kubernetes namespace and decreases the pressure on the host…


by Adeyinka Adegbenro

A key inserted into a door’s lock
A key inserted into a door’s lock

Kubernetes authentication means validating the identity of who or what is sending a request to the Kubernetes server. A request can originate from a pod, within a cluster, or from a human user. Kubernetes authentication is needed to secure an application by validating the identity of a user.

Kubernetes does not offer any native implementation for creating and managing users, which means it does not have any object-stores for users or groups. …


by Rich Burroughs

Octant logo
Octant logo

Octant is one of the best-known tools in the Kubernetes dashboard space. It’s a project that Bryan Liles built a lot of back when he was at Heptio. I remember Bryan talking on Twitter about a new tool he was working on that would help folks think about what was running in their Kubernetes clusters, and that was Octant. VMWare acquired Heptio after that, and now Bryan and Octant are both at VMWare.

Previously in this series, I looked at Lens and Headlamp, and I should say that Octant feels pretty different than those other tools. According…


by Rich Burroughs

Promo image for Viktor’s vcluster video
Promo image for Viktor’s vcluster video

It’s been great to see so many folks making videos about vcluster. This one is from Viktor Farcic who is a Developer Advocate at Upbound. Viktor explains how vcluster works, and also dives in and does a great demo. He shows how to create a virtual cluster, how to connect to it, how to deploy an application to the vcluster, and how to destroy it. It’s a really great intro if you’re just getting started with virtual clusters.

If you make content about vcluster, I’d love to hear about it. I’m Rich Burroughs in the Kubernetes Slack or you can find me on Twitter.

Originally published at https://loft.sh.


by Kasper Siig

Overhead shot of cars in traffic
Overhead shot of cars in traffic

As your organization grows and Kubernetes becomes more integrated into your daily workflow, more complex needs will arise. You probably started with a single cluster for everything, but now you see a need for multiple clusters. Perhaps you need a separate one for testing, one for specific workloads, or something else entirely.

Many in your situation have resorted to multi-tenancy in Kubernetes, the practice of having multiple non-connected tenants use a common base of resources. …


by Rich Burroughs

Headlamp logo
Headlamp logo

Headlamp is an open source web UI for Kubernetes created by the team at Kinvolk, which was recently acquired by Microsoft. It’s a great-looking alternative to the built-in Kubernetes Dashboard. You can check out the GitHub repository here.

Installation

Most of the tools in this space either provide a local app that connects to your Kubernetes cluster or a web UI that runs in the cluster itself. One of the super cool things about Headlamp is that you can use it both ways. There’s a desktop app that you can install locally. It runs on Linux, Mac, and…


by Rich Burroughs

Image with pictures of Lukas and Saiyam and info about the stream.
Image with pictures of Lukas and Saiyam and info about the stream.

Loft Labs CEO Lukas Gentele joined Saiyam Pathak on his stream to talk about vcluster. This video is another great way to get up to speed on vlcuster if you’ve heard about it and are curious. In the video, Lukas walks Saiyam through the different vcluster features, including the workflow, how to use it with Ingress, and storage considerations.

Saiyam creates a ton of great content about Kubernetes. Check out the other videos on his YouTube. He’s also hosting a show on Cloudnative.tv about Kubernetes certifications called Cert Magic, and he’s written a book about the scenarios in the CKS exam.

Originally published at https://loft.sh.


By Kasper Siig

When getting started with Docker, many developers quickly turn to Docker Compose to run their applications. Compose offers many advantages, such as having your configuration stored as code, making it easy to maintain and expand upon. Unfortunately, although it is possible to use Compose with Kubernetes, it’s not the recommended approach.

Devs will often bang their head against the wall trying to make this scenario work when they start using Kubernetes, without knowing that there’s a better way. After all, they have become used to Compose and have integrated it deeply into their workflow. …

Loft

>> www.loft.sh << Build Your Internal Kubernetes Platform With Virtual Clusters, Namespace Self-Service & Secure Multi-Tenancy

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